PRODUCT TEST: Gibson RZR S 900 Dual Exhaust

The Polaris RZR S 900 is hands down one of the Dirt Wheels crew’s favorite UTVs. It has enough power for all types of terrain and is well-suspended to handle the rough stuff. However, gaining more power with better-sounding exhaust tones is never a bad route to travel. We decided to give Gibson Performance Exhaust’s dual slip-on exhaust system a test. This product retails for $634.01, and its design makes it easy to install.

Gibson’s dual-exhaust system takes less than an hour to install. It comes with the muffler, exhaust tips, heat shield, and new heat-shield brackets.
Gibson’s dual-exhaust system takes less than an hour to install. It comes with the muffler, exhaust tips, heat shield, and new heat-shield brackets.

THE INSTALL
The stock RZR S 900’s exhaust is easy to remove, and Gibson’s is almost just as simple to install. First, you must disconnect the battery. Gibson’s system does not require the use of a power programmer to change the mapping of the air-to-fuel ratio. By disconnecting the battery the 900’s ECU will know that a freer-flowing system was installed, and once the machine idles up to operating temperature, the needed changes to the mapping are automatically taken care of.

Next, we took off the rear bodywork that has the taillights built into it. That involves a T40 Torx driver, the removal of 12 screws and unplugging the taillights. Now, there are five springs that must be taken off to then pull the stock muffler setup off of the RZR. Once that is done, the stock system can be pulled free from the 900. Next we took the stock support brackets for the rear body panel off and replaced them with the set that comes with the Gibson exhaust system. The Gibson bolt set has longer screws that push the body panel out to make room for the new heat shield and muffler.

The exhaust gasket on the end of the header pipe is reusable for the Gibson system, so next we fitted the dual exhaust with the same five springs taken from the old one. Once that is mounted up, there is a tab on each side of the dual-exhaust system that requires drilling into the RZR bed rails to install. Self-tapping screws are used to mount the tabs to the rails. Finally, you must utilize Gibson’s hardware to mount the new heat shield to the RZR. We replaced the 900’s rear body panel and screwed the top of it back on, leaving the bottom four screws out. Then we slid the heat shield in place between the new mounting brackets and body panel and finished installing the last four screws. And last, we bolted on the two exhaust tips, which concluded the install.

Gibson’s exhaust system provided our RZR with more power throughout the whole range and gave it a mean-sounding growl. On top of all that, it adds a great look to your machine.
Gibson’s exhaust system provided our RZR with more power throughout the whole range and gave it a mean-sounding growl. On top of all that, it adds a great look to your machine.

THE TEST
The most noticeable part of Gibson’s dual exhaust, aside from how good it looks, is the sound. It’s raspy and deep, which makes the RZR S 900 sound like a mean machine. Gibson’s system isn’t all for show and sound, though. We noticed power gains in the lower to mid-end power range the most. It took less throttle to get going quicker than the stock system, and the S 900 now pulls harder up hills and on the straights. The stock Polaris exhaust system was much quieter, which some of our test riders preferred. You could have a conversation while driving the RZR, but with Gibson’s system, all you can hear is the exhaust tones, unless your foot was off the throttle. While some of our testers also preferred the smoother power output from the stock system, the extra grunt of Gibson’s dual-exhaust system was well-liked, and they felt the price of $634.01 was worth spending. If you want a Gibson Performance Exhaust system for one of your toys, go to www.gibsonperform ance.com or call (951) 372-1220.

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