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ATV BUILD: TEIXEIRA TECH SCRAMBLER XP 1000

— Building a better Scrambler, By the staff of Dirt Wheels — 

 

The TT Scrambler is a powerhouse! The HMF Blackout Titan exhaust and HMF fuel optimizer increased the overall power, especially on the top end.
The TT Scrambler is a powerhouse! The HMF Blackout Titan exhaust and HMF fuel optimizer increased the overall power, especially on the top end.

 

The Polaris Scrambler XP 1000 model is a monster of a quad. In stock trim it has 89 horsepower, lots of travel in the IRS suspension and feels comfortable ergonomically. We asked ourselves, what could possibly make this already-stellar quad even better? Teixeira Tech, that’s who!

Ed Teixeira, owner of Teixeira Tech, builds suspension components and steering stems for Team UXC Polaris. Team UXC Polaris races fully modified Polaris Scrambler XP 1000s in the ever-competitive Pro Utility ATV class in the GNCC series and the Best in the Desert series. GNCC and BITD races are tough! In GNCC, courses are lined through the woods, and they get extremely rough over the span of a two-hour race. BITD races are very fast and have treacherous desert terrain for miles. It’s very crucial for the quad to be able to handle the rigors of such racing. It needs to handle the rough sections, and it needs to turn incredibly well so the rider can dodge trees at high speeds. Teixeira did his homework while working with Team UXC and built some great A-arms and steering stems that improved the Scrambler for extreme conditions. During that process, Ed built a Scrambler XP 1000 for himself, and we had the chance to test it out.

 

TEIXEIRA_SCRAMBLER_7
Having the extra ground clearance is nice. The OEM brakes worked well slowing this machine down.

 

MAKING IT BETTER

Ed went all out on his build to make it his own. Like Team UXC’s desert-racing Scramblers, Ed preferred his WX A-arms on the front and rear of the machine. The unique XGC (X-treme Ground Clearance) WX A-arms are built from 4130 chromoly, and they add welcome ground clearance over stock. They’re also built to accept a longer shock, which means more travel for the Scrambler. The lower front A-arms add 2 degrees of caster for improved steering sensitivity and added stability at high speeds.

 

Elka fully adjustable Stage 5 shocks are mounted to all four corners, and they work well in the rough.
Elka fully adjustable Stage 5 shocks are mounted to all four corners, and they work well in the rough.

 

The rear Teixeira A-arms also come with billet-aluminum sway bar linkages that connect to the lower rear A-arms with a Heim joint. Ed also added his anti-vibe +2 steering stem that puts the handlebar in a more comfortable position. The Teixeira Tech handlebar clamp is unique in that it’s adjustable in four different locations fore or aft. And last, Ed fabricated a speedo relocation mount that sits behind the handlebar pad. According to Teixeira Tech and Dirt Works Motorsports, the Scrambler has frame-flexing issues. Dirt Works provided a bolt-on gusset kit for the frame that helps keep it more rigid, thus helping it avoid breaking the frame.

Besides his parts, he used some of the best parts available for a Scrambler. Ed went with Elka Stage 5 shocks on all four corners. The Stage 5 shocks are Elka’s top-of-the-line shocks with high-/low-speed compression, rebound and preload adjustability. For further rider comfort, a Flexx handlebar and a MUD Motorsports gripper seat cover were added. The performance was upgraded by use of a full HMF Blackout Titan-Quiet exhaust system, HMF Fuel Optimizer, and a UNI dual-stage foam air filter. This machine rolls on Maxxis Bighorn 2.0 tires, Tire Block flat-prevention system and Keizer beadlock wheels. The full-coverage graphics were made by Graphic Worx.

SCRAMBLING TO HOLD ON

We chose to test the Scrambler in a desert setting, as that’s what this build was intended for. We also had our stock Scrambler on hand that we featured in our November 2016 and February 2017 issues, so we could do back-to-back comparisons. Our test unit has a Flexx handlebar, Rox Risers, OMF wheels and GBC tires. Besides that, it’s bone stock. We started out on our Scrambler, and then after about an hour of riding we switched to the Teixeira machine.

 

 A +2-inch anti-vibe Teixeira steering stem and Flexx handlebar were added for rider comfort.
A +2-inch anti-vibe Teixeira steering stem and Flexx handlebar were added for rider comfort.

 

The biggest star of the Teixeira build was the suspension. The turning was much more responsive, and in some instances it felt like it was too much, but more ride time on it solved that issue. It carved in and out of tight washes like it was its job to do so. Compared to the stock Fox shocks, which are only compression and preload adjustable, the Elka Stage 5 shocks had an aggressive feel. It handled big whoops and G-outs extremely well, but on the chatter bumps, we did feel more feedback in our hands than the stock machine. It was an easy fix to remedy that by changing the high-speed compression setting on the shocks. The ground clearance on the Teixeira WX A-arms was confidence-inspiring. It straddled loose rocks and boulders much easier than our stock machine. The Teixeira quad also felt better in the air. It felt more stable, and for whatever reason it felt lighter in the air. On harsh landings, the Elkas soaked up the hits better than the stock Fox shocks.

 

We really liked the clean speedometer relocation bracket that Teixeira produces. It clears the plastics well and is still very visible when riding.
We really liked the clean speedometer relocation bracket that Teixeira produces. It clears the plastics well and is still very visible when riding.

 

Having the anti-vibe +2 stem and the Flexx handlebar reduced a lot of the vibration that arises from the big twin-cylinder engine. Usually, that vibration is most apparent in the stock steel handlebars that the Scrambler comes with. In sections with sharp rocks, we felt we needed to tiptoe through them with our Scrambler, but with Ed’s quad having Tire Blocks, we ran through those sections hard and came out on the other end without any flats. Along with that ability to pound rocks, we could confidently run 5 psi of air in each tire thanks to the Tire Blocks and Keizer bead-lock wheels. The Bighorns loved that lower air pressure and shot us up nasty hill-climbs in a hurry.

 

Like the front, the Teixeira Tech XGC WX A-arms are mounted in the rear. Another benefit of these arms is being able to run a longer shock with more travel than stock.
Like the front, the Teixeira Tech XGC WX A-arms are mounted in the rear. Another benefit of these arms is being able to run a longer shock with more travel than stock.

 

The power on our stock Scrambler is smooth, and despite having even more power, the Teixeira machine was smoother than stock. Having the HMF Fuel Optimizer installed offered a great fuel map that gave Ed’s Scrambler the correct amount of fuel. It helped with throttle response, and it ran cooler than our stock machine. We saw power gains with the HMF Blackout Titan quiet exhaust system over our stock dual exhaust. The biggest gain of power was on the top end. Another treat is that the HMF sounded great and had low decibels. Since it had more power, the MUD Motorsports seat cover was a welcomed add-on with the extra power. It kept our butts planted around corners and straightaways.

 

The Teixeira Tech XGC (Xtreme Ground Clearance) WX A-arms are a big improvement over the stock arms when it comes to ground clearance, and they offer 2 degrees of caster for improved handling.
The Teixeira Tech XGC (Xtreme Ground Clearance) WX A-arms are a big improvement over the stock arms when it comes to ground clearance, and they offer 2 degrees of caster for improved handling.

 

OUR THOUGHTS

The old saying “more is better” rang true with the Teixeira Tech Scrambler XP 1000. Don’t get us wrong; our almost-stock Scrambler is an absolute beast, and it’s a fun machine, even in stock trim, but Ed’s Scrambler is the Trophy Truck version of Polaris’ Scrambler. It’s easy to see now why Team UXC Polaris finishes so well in the woods and the desert. This machine can do it all—and do it all very well. Casual riders may not need all of these parts, but what casual rider buys a Scrambler XP 1000? These parts will improve your Scrambler without question. Ed’s Scrambler may be in the running for the best sport utility quad we’ve tested thus far.

 

Teixeira Tech spared no expense on this Scrambler XP 1000. It looks fast just sitting there!
Teixeira Tech spared no expense on this Scrambler XP 1000. It looks fast just sitting there!

 

PARTS LIST:

DirtworksMotorsports.com, 417-469-3478, Bolt-on frame gusset kit $300

ElkaSuspension.com, 800-557-0552, Elka Stage 5 front shocks $1,699.99, Elka Stage 5 rear shocks $1,699.99

FasstCo.com, 877-306-1801, 15-degree Quad Racer-bend ,Flexx handlebar $359.99

HMFRacing.com, 216-631-6980, Blackout Titan full exhaust system $750.95, Gen 3/3.5 fuel optimizer $289.95

KeizerWheels.com, 712-737-3053, 12-inch 4×4 three-piece bead-ock wheels $300 per wheel

Maxxis.comBighorn 2.0 25x8x12 6-ply tire $152 per tire

MudMotorsports.com, 765-349-8938, Custom seat cover $224.99

OuryGrips.com, 870-869-3265, ATV grip $20

RideTireBlocks.com, 253-973-5111, 25x8x12 Tire Blocks $155.95 per tire

TeixeiraTech.com, 209-833-9160, Adjustable anti-vibe 1 1/8-inch handlebar clamp $105, Scrambler XP +2 anti-vibe steering stem $249, Scrambler XP front a-arms WX $845, Scrambler XP rear a-arms WX $845, Scrambler XP speedo relocation mount $65

WorxIndy.com, 317-222-4862, Graphic Worx Indy custom graphic kit $229.99

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