UTV TEST: Polaris RZR S 1000

As part of Polaris’ planet domination, they do not only want to have machines better than their competition, they want to offer a machine for everyone. The Polaris RZR lineup is so stacked, we can’t think of anything that is missing. Along with July’s announcement of the XP Turbo, Polaris also revealed the Ace 900 and the RZR S 1000. The S is aimed at the woods or tight trail rider who wants the fastest thing out there, along with great handling and a strong chassis for the tight stuff. GNCC racers are going to love the offering as much as trail riders will. The S 1000 sits in a 60-inch-wide chassis with dual A-arm suspension on all four corners. The rear A-arm system will take abuse much better than a trailing-arm setup like what’s found on the XP models. What you do sacrifice slightly is wheel travel. However, stability is increased, as well as the machine’s ability to turn in tight spaces. Two color options of the S 1000 are available, which are white or black, and both choices come with electronic power steering.

RZRS1K_3IMG_5183

IT’S ALL IN THE SUSPENSION
Since day one of the first S model, the RZR has been known for its suspension, then the XP upped the ante even more. However, the S models have also been known for superb handling too. The $17,999 1000 is no different. The four A-arm-equipped corners are outfitted with 2-inch Fox Podium shocks. Up front travel is limited to 12.25 inches, while the rear offers a full inch more movement. One rear sway bar is used to control body roll, and it’s nowhere as bad as it is on the XP 1000. With the dials set towards the stiffer side, we were able to pound rocks and roots hard while skipping over water bars with ease. At the 20–40-mph speeds we were doing, we could not get the machine to bottom out. When we weren’t racing through the woods we backed the compression clickers to full soft and got a plush ride. The Fox shocks really respond to the input of the clickers well.

Dual A-arms connect to a spindle, hub and 12-inch wheel on the front of all S models. The tires are super-strong 27-inchtall GBC Dirt Commanders.
Dual A-arms connect to a spindle, hub and 12-inch wheel on the front of all S models. The tires are super-strong 27-inchtall GBC Dirt Commanders.

Other differences for the S model are, it’s equipped with smaller 12-inch wheels and smaller spindles. Ground clearance is a little less at 12.5 inches, and that could be the result of the 2-inch-smaller 27-inch tires. In this case the tires are GBC Dirt Commanders instead of the Maxxis Big Horns like what are found on the XP. The S 900 also uses Dirt Commanders.

The rear of the S model has a lower A-arm paired with a single upper control arm. This setup can take a side impact, like sliding into a tree, better than the trailing-arm setup of an XP. GNCC racers will love not bending radius rods and breaking shocks.
The rear of the S model has a lower A-arm paired with a single upper control arm. This setup can take a side impact, like sliding into a tree, better than the trailing-arm setup of an XP. GNCC racers will love not bending radius rods and breaking shocks.

The smaller footprint not only allows the S to fit in the tight woods better, but it also allows you to load the RZR into the back of some full-sized pickups. This helpful fact is one of the reasons why our 900 has more miles on it than our XP 1000. Having the ability to squeeze a machine into a truck instead of loading it on a trailer gets us out on the trails much more often.

The S chassis has very little body roll and is more predictable than the XP. The slightly less wheel travel will also allow you to confidently jump off and over things the XP would not like. Drivers will have more confidence in the new RZR S 1000.
The S chassis has very little body roll and is more predictable than the XP. The slightly less wheel travel will also allow you to confidently jump off and over things the XP would not like. Drivers will have more confidence in the new RZR S 1000.

HORSEPOWER
Polaris gave the S 1000 their best ProStar engine; however, it is toned down slightly and puts out an even 100 horsepower instead of the 110 ponies of the XP 1000. Clutching is much smoother on the S 1000 versus the 900, where it runs in a higher rpm range for more power. The 999cc motor has more torque, so it can be ran at a lower rpm. Either way, the ProStar power is a blast to drive. It goes 0–60 in a few seconds and tops out at around 70 mph, although we think it will be hard to reach those speeds in the woods. The throttle is smooth and doesn’t bounce when you go slowly over the rough stuff. The brakes work equally as well without being finicky, even when wet.

MORE FUN
Driving the S 1000 is a blast. It’s predictable in the corners and does what you tell it to. You can slide it predictably and knife though the woods with confidence. This model would be just as good in the open desert as it is in the woods. Sure, it won’t tackle 3-footdeep whoops like an XP will, but it will do just about everything else equally well. The cockpits are nearly identical, with the exception of the center storage box cover and the roll cage, which is missing the six-point downtubes in the rear. Our test unit had the new $399 plastic roof from Polaris. It’s a simple black design with a small clear middle section that allows a little bit of light into the cockpit. The S 1000 comes stock with the same V-shaped doors that the 900 has and the XPs as well. Although we like those better than nets, they do allow mud, sand and dirt to fly on to the driver or passenger if you are carving hard and accelerating quick at the same time. Like with all RZRs, that’s the funnest part of driving them. If you like to ride anywhere other than the rough, whooped-out trails that are found in the Southwest, consider looking into the 2016 Polaris RZR S 1000; it’s one of the best RZRs you can buy.

The S shares the same cockpit as the XP models. However, it comes without the closeable center pockets and so far is not available with a GPS display unit.
The S shares the same cockpit as the XP models. However, it comes without the closeable center pockets and so far is not available with a GPS display unit.

SPECS
Engine…………..Liquid-cooled, DOHC,
twin-cylinder 4-stroke
Displacement……………………………999cc
Fuel system…………………………………..EFI
Fuel capacity………………………… 9.5 gal
Final drive………………………………..Shaft
Length/width/height…… 106”/60”/71.5”
Wheelbase……………………………………79”
Ground clearance……………………..12.5”
Claimed dry weight………………1235 lb.
Suspension/wheel travel:
Front…………… Dual A-arms w/ 12.25”
Rear…………………………………………13.2”
Brakes:
Front……………….Dual hydraulic discs
Rear……………….Dual hydraulic discs
Tires:
Front……………………………………. 27×9-12
Rear………………………………….. 27×11-12
Colors…………………………….White, black
Price……………………………………….$17,999
Contact………………….www.polaris.com

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.